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Tax-Loss Harvesting Platform Unsellable is Building ‘The World's Largest Collection of Worthless NFTs

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The platform has so far purchased over 7,700 no-longer valuable NFTs that previous owners can count as losses to reduce taxable capital gains.

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j_k
35 days ago
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Tax loss harvesting service emerges to help collectors unload their worthless NFTs

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A black rectangle with various colored squares on it, followed by "Unsellable" in white capitals on a black rectangle background

If you bought an NFT for $1,000 and it's now worthless, you still have to find someone willing to buy it before you can claim it as a loss on your taxes. A project called "Unsellable" has emerged to fill that need—buying worthless NFTs for $0.01 (for a small fee) so that people can claim the losses.

"This tool really helped me unload those embarrassing early NFT Hype investments. Should shave about $1000 off my tax bill", a supposed user writes in a testimonial blurb on the site (although the testimonials appear to be faked).

Perhaps someone has finally found a viable crypto business model after all.

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j_k
37 days ago
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1 public comment
HarlandCorbin
37 days ago
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WTF??? No, they should not be able to claim this as a loss. I, as a taxpayer, should not be subsidizing idiocy like NFT crap.
cosmotic
37 days ago
If and only if the person that sold the NFT claimed the income, in other words fat chance
HarlandCorbin
37 days ago
Not even then. If I pay a 1st grader $1000 for a drawing, and sell it for a penny, I should not be allowed to claim a loss. I have just paid stupid tax. These idiots should be paying their stupid tax and shut up about it.

LastPass users: Your info and vault data is now in hackers’ hands

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Calendar with words Time to change password. Password management.

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)

LastPass, one of the leading password managers, said that hackers obtained a wealth of personal information belonging to its customers as well as encrypted and cryptographically hashed passwords and other data stored in customer vaults.

The revelation, posted on Thursday, represents a dramatic update to a breach LastPass disclosed in August. At the time, the company said that a threat actor gained unauthorized access through a single compromised developer account to portions of the password manager's development environment and "took portions of source code and some proprietary LastPass technical information." The company said at the time that customers’ master passwords, encrypted passwords, personal information, and other data stored in customer accounts weren't affected.

Sensitive data, both encrypted and not, copied

In Thursday’s update, the company said hackers accessed personal information and related metadata, including company names, end-user names, billing addresses, email addresses, telephone numbers, and IP addresses customers used to access LastPass services. The hackers also copied a backup of customer vault data that included unencrypted data such as website URLs and encrypted data fields such as website usernames and passwords, secure notes, and form-filled data.

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j_k
44 days ago
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'Avatar: The Way of Water' is the first great high frame rate movie

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Avatar: The Way of Water is a triumph. As a sequel to the highest-grossing film ever, which was criticized for its formulaic story (and the surprisingly small ripple it had on pop culture), the new movie is a genuine surprise. It's a sweeping epic that reflects on the nature of families, our relationship to the natural world and humanity's endless thirst for violence and plunder. Fans of the original film often had to make excuses for writer and director James Cameron's stilted script, but that's no longer the case for The Way of Water, thanks to additional help from Amanda Silver and Rick Jaffa (who both worked on the recent criminally under-loved Planet of the Apes trilogy).

Perhaps most impressive, though, is that James Cameron has managed to craft the best high frame rate (HFR) movie yet. Certain scenes play back at 48 frames per second, giving them a smoother and more realistic sheen compared to the standard 24fps. That leads to 3D action scenes that feel incredibly immersive — at times HFR can make you forget that the lush alien wildlife on Pandora isn't real.

Avatar: The Way of Water
Fox/Disney

Unlike the handful of high frame rate movies we've already seen – The Hobbit trilogy, as well as Ang Lee's Gemini Man and Billy Lynn's Long Half-Time Walk – the Avatar sequel deploys the technology in a unique way. Rather than using HFR throughout the entire movie, Cameron relies on it for major action sequences, while slower dialog scenes appear as if they're running at 24fps. To do that, the entire film actually runs at 48fps, while the calmer scenes use doubled frames to trick your brain into seeing them at the typical theatrical frame rate.

If this sounds a bit confusing, your brain may have a similar reaction while watching the film. The Way of Water often jumps from hyper-real HFR to pseudo-24 fps in the same scene — at one point, I counted around a dozen switches in a few minutes. This is a strategy Cameron has been discussing for years. In 2016, he noted that HFR is "a tool, not a format," and later he rejected Ang Lee's attempt at using HFR for Gemini Man's entire runtime.

Cameron's dual-pronged approach to HFR is bound to be controversial. Even for someone who appreciates what the technology has to offer — pristine 3D action scenes with no blurring or strobing — it took me a while to get used to flipping between high frame rate and 24 fps footage. With Gemini Man, my brain got used to the hyper-reality of HFR within 15 minutes. In The Way of Water, I was almost keeping an eye out for when the footage changed.

Avatar: The Way of Water
Fox/Disney

Despite the distracting format changes, The Way of Water’s high frame rate footage ultimately worked for me. At times, the film appears to be a window into the world of Pandora, with breathtaking shots of lush forests and lush oceans. It makes all of Cameron’s creations, from enormous flying fish-like creatures that you can ride, to alien whales with advanced language, appear as if they’re living and breathing creatures. HFR also works in tandem with the sequel's more modern CG animation, making the Na'vi and their culture feel all the more real.

 Over the film’s three hour and twelve-minute runtime, I eventually managed to see what the director was aiming for, even if his ambition exceeded his grasp.  (Cameron, who has the world’s first [Avatar] and third-highest grossing films [Titanic] under his belt, and who dove into the Marianas Trench in a self-designed personal submarine, suggests you can use the bathroom anytime you want during The Way of Water. You’ll just catch up the next time you see it in theaters. Baller.)

The re-release of Avatar earlier this month also used a combination of HFR and traditional footage (in addition to brightening the picture and upscaling the film to 4K). But even though that revamp grossed over $70 million on its own, there hasn't been much discussion about how it integrated high frame rate footage. (I saw it on a Regal RPX screen, which offered 3D but no extra frames, sadly.) There's a better chance you'll be able to catch Avatar: The Way of Water exactly how Cameron intended. It'll be screening in 4K, HFR and 3D at all AMC Dolby Cinema locations and select IMAX theaters (single laser screens get everything, some dual-laser screens will only offer 2K 3D with HFR). While you could see it in 2D, why would you?

Avatar: The Way of Water

After suffering through the interminable Hobbit movies in HFR, I figured the technology was mostly a waste of time, yet another money-grab that Hollywood can use to pump up ticket prices. Director Peter Jackson struggled to recreate the magic of his Lord of the Rings trilogy, and amid production issues, he also failed to change the way he shot the Hobbit films to account for HFR. So that led to sets that looked like they were ripped from B-grade fantasy movies and costumes that seemingly came from a Spirit Halloween pop-up.

Ang Lee’s more studious attempts at using the technology, especially with the action scenes in Gemini Man, convinced me HFR still had some potential. But even he struggled along the way. Billy Lynn’s Long Half-Time Walk is a cinematic curiosity, where HFR makes slow dialog scenes appear too distractingly real. Gemini Man was cursed by a messy script and the need to be a big-budget Will Smith blockbuster.

Avatar: The Way of Water
Fox/Disney

Avatar: The Way of Water benefits from the creative failures of all of the earlier high frame rate films. For many, it’ll be their introduction to this technology, so it’ll be interesting to see how general audiences respond. Video games and hyper-real YouTube action footage have made 60fps footage far more common, so I could see younger audiences, those raised on hundreds of hours of Minecraft and Fortnite, vibing with Cameron’s vision. Everyone else will need more convincing. For me, though, I’m just glad there’s finally a high frame rate film that’s genuinely great, instead of just a technical exercise.





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j_k
53 days ago
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[YMMV] Amazon: Link Venmo & Earn $10 Credit

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The Offer

Offer for linking Venmo (Prime only, might not work for everybody. Our affiliate link here & below) | Offer for signing up for Venmo

  • Amazon is offering a $10 credit when you link your Venmo. This offer is for Prime members only (seems to be available for all Prime members.)
  • Amazon is offering a $10 credit when you signup for Venmo.

 

The Fine Print

  • Valid until 12/31/22

Our Verdict

Easy $10 Amazon credit which can now be linked with Amazon.

Hat tip to Dans Deals

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j_k
88 days ago
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With shots and infections, the most common COVID symptoms have shifted

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A close-up view of a woman sneezing.

Enlarge / A close-up view of a woman sneezing. (credit: Getty | David Jones)

As people build up immunity to SARS-CoV-2 through vaccines, boosters, and infections, the most commonly reported symptoms of COVID-19 have shifted, making the deadly pandemic infection more difficult for many people to distinguish from standard cold-weather viruses.

That's according to recent survey data collected in the ZOE COVID Study, an app-based study with over 4 million users that was created by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, King's College London, and the health science company, ZOE.

Since COVID-19 emerged, the common symptoms that have topped standard lists include fever, chills, a persistent cough, and shortness of breath. As the virus spread around the planet, loss of taste and smell were also reported as telltale signs. But these days, those symptoms are almost completely absent from the top five.

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j_k
102 days ago
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